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, the seeming front runner. jon huntsman has made it clear that he will not compete in iowa. he could be a formidable challenger. the question is will that steepen the victory for the people that come out of that state doing well or not? what inevitably happens in iowa is the person who comes out of that race comes out with a lot of momentum. what is important is not just the perception among voters, but the perception among donors. so what you will see is people cashing in on those victories. i think iowa is an important state no matter to compete staircase. how important it will be remains to be seen. host: kathy kiely is the politics managing editor. the numbers to call -- a story in "to "the huffington post" recently -- how does that play out in terms of candidates figuring out their strategy and carrying their message? guest: it plays out because this is one of the controversial aspects of our election system. we use an electoral college system which makes certain states very important, states where the candidates know the battle will be closely fought. other states become flight
on the outcome. abc's jon karl joins us with the latest. what about it? how close are we finally to a deal? >> reporter: getting close to a deal. the outlines of this deal include up to $3 trillion in spending cuts over the next ten years including some cuts to popular entitlement programs like medicare and social security, also, elizabeth, it would include a promise or a commitment that congress would bring more money in through tax revenues by reforming the code, closing some of those loopholes, something that congress would act on. >> that last one, isn't that basically a tax increase in disguise? >> well, certainly some will call it that. the rates won't go up. congress would have to act over the next year. if they didn't ago, automatic steps would be taken that both sides wouldn't like which would be tax hikes and spending cuts possibly talking about repealing part of the health care bill. >> even if president obama and speaker boehner reach a deal they have their own rank and file to make happy. i was struck by a comment by barbara mikulski. we heard reports of a trillion dollar cut
the talks by vice president biden. the majority leader represented house republicans, jon kyl for senate republicans, and that vice president. they have been talking about all lot of cuts, both to discretionary and non- discretionary spending, but there the problem is that it does not seem to add at to what they would need to meet the president's requirements to get the country through the next election. that would be somewhere in the area of $2.4 trillion increase in the debt ceiling. john boehner has made it clear that for any increase in the debt ceiling, they will not need more than a one-one increased ratio. quite frankly the democrats have not agreed to that level of cuts. it looks like they will go back today, scour potential areas of saying that they have talked about, and see how much they can agree to and go from there. agree to and go from there. host: in your article from yesterday's with the headline " boehner tells conference big deal no longer operative," you said that there were criticisms for the grand bargain. he pays -- he faced opposition from eric cantor. they presen
)s, other big costs. jake tapper and jon karl have been tracking it. >> reporter: last night after their prime time addresses to house speaker john boehner was overheard saying he didn't sign up to go mano a mano with the president after the president called for congress to compromise. the president spoke sternly to the american people last night blaming house republicans, especially freshmen, for holding up a debt deal. >> the only reason this balanced approach isn't on its way to becoming law right now is because a significant number of republicans in congress are insisting on a different approach. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner responded that the president wants to continue his rampant spending. >> the president often said we need a balanced approach, which in washington means, we spend more and you pay more. >> reporter: right now there are two competing bills, to raise the debt ceiling and reduce the deficit. a house one that likely cannot pass the senate and a senate one that cannot likely pass the house. both cut more than $1 trillion in spending and do not raise ta
you to explain yourself and try to bring people over. it is not enough to smirk and do the jon stewart thing and said they are so stupid. the people with a minority view have to make the case. usually they will not buy it, but sometimes that well. host: you had a conversation -- you had a conversation with jon stewart? guest: i have met him before. [laughter] >> henderson, nevada. you know where that is? guest: of course. guest: of course. >> you mentioned the u.s. civil libertarians. the department of education, is a relevant institution in today's society? with state budgets controlling education, where do you think civics in high school civics in high school curriculums belong? guest: i have done a couple of documentaries for fox of education recently. i am sort of up on it. i could not to speak your second question. my sense is that civics is being de-emphasized, but i have no data to back that up. english is important, as far as i'm concerned. it not only allows you to engage with the world, past and present, but it makes you a more interesting person, one of the main reasons we a
as failed states around the world and 9:15 we'll hear from jon jarvis, director of national park service. all that, your calls and phone calls, too, and a look at the papers, i'm "washington journal," it starts at 7:00. we'll see you then. national captioning institute] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] a >> the bewitching hour has arrived. it's 10:00 a.m. i'm tom mann a senior fellow here at brookings, and i'm delighted to welcome all of you. with us here at brookings this morning and to our live espn audience to a -- c-span audience to a session entitled a status report on congressional redistricting. now, you may have noticed on the screens redistricting d.i., wording why that's there. we understand some of you are compelled to tweet wherever you are, and if you do, we want you to know that is the event hash tag. i know you're shocked that i actually said that, norm, but there is it is. >> it was written down so you know. >> i'm a well-known tweeter.
report on the choices that consumers are making in the wireless phone market. >> jon huntsman was that the republican party rally on saturday. he talked about his priorities if elected. that includes addressing the national debt and government spending and launching an industrial revolution to create jobs. this a little less than 40 minutes. [applause] >> my grandfather was an educator. he used to teach his three sons that if you want to succeed in life and achieve anything worth achieving, you become not a teacher but an educator. that was the term he used. he was the principle of a high school -- principal of a high school in california. he said if you cannot do that, if you could have a fallback and go back into business. my father went into business. he did not cut it as an educator. he did ok. i got the same lecture from my father growing up. if you want to make anything of your life, you have to go into business. that is where you can make things come create value, and change the world. not everybody is cut out for business. you have to have a fallback position in life i
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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